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How Do Remarriage and Having More Children Affect a Child Support Order?

a couple fighting while their son is sadColorado law is direct when it comes to child support orders. The Law Office of Gordon N. Shayne, based in Colorado Springs, says that determining this type of support comes after the finalization of a child custody agreement or a parenting plan. After finalizing the child support amount, the law allows an Income Wage Assignment to streamline the monthly payments.

But what happens when remarriage and more children enter the picture?

How Does Remarriage of Either Parent Affect Child Support?

In Colorado, it doesn’t matter whether you or your ex-spouse gets married again. State law says that remarriage of either the custodial or non-custodial parent isn’t a reason to modify a child support order. On a related note, judges do not include a new spouse’s wealth or income in child support decisions.

Remarriage does not affect child support unless the new spouse regularly gives the custodial or non-custodial parent money just for spending. In this rare case, the money may count as income. The child support order remains status quo, however, when the new spouse only provides money for basic necessities and household expenses.

How Does Having More Children Affect Child Support?

Colorado law says that having more children, by birth or adoption, does not affect a child support order. The court won’t grant your request to lower financial obligations to an existing child if you have more children after the settlement. A judge will consider an existing child support award, though, to ensure that the parent’s income meets all child support obligations.

Under Which Circumstances Does Child Support End?

Colorado’s child support law obliges you to provide financial support for your children until they are 19 years old. However, it may end if your ex-spouse remarries and their spouse legally adopts your children. If the kids are under 18 years old, the Children’s Code states that they are legally available for adoption. Only then can you consult a lawyer for changes in the child support order.